Boreal

Women and the Koran

Paperback, 115 pages

The Koran, where women are concerned is all about control, control over what Allah considers a woman’s innate desire to want to seduce every man in sight to satisfy an irresistible longing to touch and be touched, and thereby bring chaos to the orderly world of the Koran.

This control extends to keeping her without any means to support herself, first as a prisoner in the home of her father, then in the home of her husband. Her most significant, and often only possession, is her dowry, which the Koran allows her to use to "ransom herself" should she wish to leave an abusive relationship, leaving her with effectively nothing after the divorce.

Women also play a central role in the Koran in getting men to behave and do what is expected of them. Women and sex are Allah's way of gaining and rewarding the loyalty of men, having come to the conclusion that men aspire to no higher ideals than to fornicate to their hearts content, in this world and the next.

Women’s loyalty, on the other hand, will be assured by making men their overlords ...

Contents

A Divine Bias

Sex, and When Resistance is Futile

Why Believing Men Are Always Right

A Prophet and a Prude

Who Gets What

The Invisible, Illiterate Woman

Wills and Witnesses

Husband Dies

Wife Dies

A Vicious Circle

God’s Will

Women As A Field To Be Ploughed

Women of the Book and Slave-Girls

Marriage

Widows

Daughters-in-Law

Orphans and When a Son Is Not a Son

Divorce and Who Gets the Kids 

Spinsters and Prostitutes

The Suckling Imperative

 

The Perfect Wife

A Man and His Wives

In the Prophet's House

A Taste of Honey

A Child Bride’s Indiscretion

The Lost Verse

A Lost Verse Remembered

The Satanic Verses

The Cult of Masculinity

Women and What It Means To Be Civilized

Women of Islam

Women of Sumer

Civilization In The Balance

Appendices

Rukaya Saves the Prophet

What Aisha Saw

The Reward of the Female Suicide Bomber

Sex and the Booty

Witches and Sorceresses

Women on Fire


The front cover is from a photograph by John Goddard of the Toronto Star which has been embossed for artistic purposes and to obscure the identity of the participants in a prayer in the cafeteria of a Toronto, Ontario (Canada) public school.

At the very top of the picture are prostrated boys and men. Behind them it is women and girls. At the bottom of the cover you can make out school girls sitting and watching. They cannot participate in the prayer because they are menstruating, and in the eyes of Allah are unclean.