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Fort McMurray's New Mosque

What they will be teaching children at

Fort McMurray's new mosque

Males are using women’s ignorance of the Koran against them. This has to change starting with women because it is believing women who transmit this misogynous male interpretation of the Koran from generation to generation.

Asma Lamrabet, hematologist, author and Muslim activist during an interview on Radio-Canada (my translation).

Globe and Mail cover photo

Fort McMurray’s Muslim community plans an ambitious, multicultural mosque … It’s a $50-million, 10-acre complex – a brand new home for Fort McMurray’s Muslim community, breaking ground this spring ...

At one end will be a minaret and two prayer halls: enough to fit 1,200 men and, separately, up to 800 women. At the other end, a kindergarten-to-Grade-12 Islamic school would teach up to 1,000 children the province’s core curriculum alongside the Koran.

Globe and Mail Feb 21, 2014

You have to wonder why women in the flattering cover propaganda photograph in the Globe and Mail would be entranced by the idea that they will be segregated and that their little girls will be taught that they are inferior to little boys and to accept this diminished status because God and His Messenger said so, both describing them as dim-witted; and when they marry to immediately consent to whatever their husbands demand, even of a sexual nature, or risk a beating and be grateful less they burn in Hell, the horrible fate of the vast majority of women according to God's Messenger.

Fort McMurray’s imam, Abdurrahmann Murad, has come full circle: Born in Surrey, B.C., he left Canada at 19 to study at a university in Riyadh. “It’s one of the most prestigious institutions that teaches sharia,” he explains of the Saudi Arabian school. Then, a few years ago, he came back to Canada to spread the word.

On his personal website, the imam has posted links to provocative essays, authored by other Saudi-educated scholars, which he has translated into English. One such essay, The Rules on How to Interact with Non-Muslims, starts out with an analysis of Sura 5, Verse 51 of the Koran – “Take not the Jews and Christians for Friends.” It goes on to explore how Muslims are to deal with a kafir (infidel), a munafiq (hypocrite) or an apostate in times of peace and war. Another is titled Every Religious Innovation is a Means of Misguidance.

Asked about such essays, the imam says he should be judged by his own words and actions, and not what he has translated in the past. He says that “you go through phases in life” and adds that he wouldn’t do such translations now.

Globe and Mail,  Fort McMurray’s Muslim community plans an ambitious, multicultural mosque, Feb 20, 2015

Saying you will no longer translate what the Saudi-trained non-English imams write is not the same as saying that you, a Saudi-trained imam will not preach what the Saudis have taught you.

Forth McMurray's Saudi trained imam will be expected to preach and teach at the new mosque what the Globe  and Mail describes as "the common denominators laid out at the time of the religion’s seventh-century origins. Back then, says community leader Mr. Abdo, there were no divisions in Islam – 'just the Prophet Mohammed, the Koran and the tradition of the Prophet.'"

While I am sure he means well, a return to the time of the Prophet is the ultimate goal of every Islamic terrorists group from Al Qaeda to Islamic State. And yes, there were no division among Muslims during the time of the Prophet, and for good reason.

Bernard Payeur