Boreal

Fitna and

The Seductive Sounds of Hatred and Cruelty

I once knew a girl who was just mad about Julio Iglesias and probably still is. He was not yet well known in Canada when she returned from a vacation in South America with one or more of his albums. The first time she played his songs for me, for us, I became a fan.

I did not understand a word he sang, but his melodies were captivating and he had such a beautiful voice. She said his songs were all about love and I believed her, and years later when he started recording in English the same songs I had heard in Spanish, I believed her even more.

Geert Wilders is leader of the Party for Freedom (PVV), the third-leading political party in the Netherlands. In the spirit of Theodoor van Gogh, he also made a film about Islam.

I have seen his film Fitna, and yes, it is provocative, but definitely not as provocative as the 9/11, and other terrorist attacks which it recalls using verses from the Koran; verses which may have been the inspiration for the attacks (the PVV would ban the Koran because of the preponderance of violent and hate-filled verses).

What is most striking about his film is not the images of the dead and mutilated, but the lyrical and mesmerizing rendition of the verses which may have motivated those responsible for the carnage in America and Europe and now North Africa e.g. Algeria.

If you don’t understand Arabic you can almost imagine yourself making love to an accapella rendering of Allah's revelations, except that, unlike the verses of Julio Iglesias, they have nothing much to do with love.


If the violence and hate that are contained in verses sung accapella (singing without instrumental accompaniment), broadcast to the Islamic community in Arabic were broadcast in English on MTV for example, there would be an uproar.

Non-Muslims would be appalled that impressionable young minds are subjected to so much violence and hate forcefully expressed in lyrical, encouraging words in a language that only insiders can understand.

Bernard Payeur, May ‎22, ‎2017