Boreal

Boreal and Religion

Why all the the postings on religion?

At Boreal we believe in democracy, freedom of speech and expression, equality before the law, equality of the sexes, life and the pursuit of happiness; all of which are threatened by a resurgence of religious fervour which may bring an end to the fragile exception.

A resurgence which is again providing the justification for unnecessary wars and unspeakable atrocities.

Why does Boreal, when it comes to religion, focus almost exclusively on Islam and not Christianity which is still Canada's dominant religion?

It is not because Christianity is not worthy of more postings. Not at all. The main reason for focusing on Islam is because non-Muslims know next to nothing of consequence about this major religion which will change Canada and the world in ways that we are only beginning to appreciate.

Aren't Islam and Christianity more or less the same?

Islam and Christianity do have a number of things in common. Both, in our view, are in a conflict of interest when it comes to solving the major problems facing humanity from world hunger, poverty, over-population, AIDS, extinction of animal and plant life, climate change to violence against women... to simply getting along.

A solution to these problems puts these religions in a conflict of interest, for it would make it more difficult for them to peddle their message that God loves misery, that a wretched existence increases one's chances of entering His Kingdom.

For both religions, being poor and miserable while maintaining a blind unyielding faith in humanity's alleged invisible friend is almost a guarantee of eternal bliss after death.

Where Christianity and Islam part company is in the message of their respective protagonist.

The Way: Jesus or Muhammad?

So at Boreal, there is no god?

I did not say that. Who knows! We are not keen on any religious icon, dead or alive, though we did find ourselves rediscovering Jesus, after reading Thomas Cahill’s beautiful portrait of his life and times in his book Desire of the Everlasting Hills, The World Before and After Christ.

Cahill portrays Jesus, not as the Son of God as claimed by Christians, not as a prophet as claimed by Muslims, but as a wonderful human being, a prince-of-a-man, a professor extraordinaire of the humanities. His simple philosophy about getting along. “Do unto others as you would have them do on to you” just about does it for us.

If you admit to liking Jesus, why don't you like his religion?

He did not create any religion, others did that.

So, if you don't believe in religion, how do you set your moral compass at Boreal?

Mencius, a disciple of Confucius, observed more than 400 years before Christ that “human intuition is inherently good and should serve as a guide to action and choice.” This we believe.

We don’t need religion, and I suspect neither do you, to tell you what is good and what is evil; to tell you what is the difference between right and wrong.

If religion does serve a purpose, it is to warn us that evil comes in many disguises, often in the form of preachers and would-be saviours who pretend to know the nature of our existence, where we came from and what is our final destination, if any.

Bernard Payeur