Boreal

The Truth About Martyrdom

No end to the obscenity!

On May 22, 2017 an Islamic terrorist detonated a shrapnel-laden homemade bomb as people were leaving the Manchester Arena following a concert by Ariana Grande killing twenty-three people, including the attacker, and wounding 139, more than half of them children.

The following is from a debate following the massacre between Muslim clerics Dr. Jamal Rifi and Sheikh Mohammad Tawhidi, hosted by Australia’s Channel Seven, in which the two argue the role religion played in the attack.

Tawhidi on the radicalisation of the Manchester bomber and his generation:

Basically we need to be very realistic when dealing with this matter. You have a twenty-two year old who gets radicalised over two, three sermons in a Friday mosque gathering … this age is an age when someone would expect people to be going out, having fun. But no, we have a large number of youth that are being radicalised.

This happens because of the books that we have, the Islamic scriptures that we have; they push the Muslim youth to believe that if you go out there and kill the infidels, that's how you will gain Paradise.

On the massacres being a continuation of a very old war:

For the past one thousand four hundred years we have had a religion of war, that is exactly what we have had, this is not something I am imagining, these are facts. We’ve had many wars.

How did Islam spread from Saudi Arabia down to Indonesia and Bosnia, all spread by the sword. We had many wars. For someone to come and say that Islamic scriptures have nothing to do with it, I mean, that’s against the facts, that’s not true. Islamic scriptures are what is pushing these people to behead the infidels.

Let me tell you something, the people that are beheading, that mister, the person that killed the young girls in Manchester did so believing he was going to dine with the Prophet Muhammad that very night, that is what the Islamic scriptures tell them.

Alleluia!


Firdaus is where the Prophet and Abedi probably dined on the night of the massacre. An eat-and-dash I expect with the young bomber anxious to have a go at the facsimiles of the girls he killed.

There is no end to the obscenity.

Bernard Payeur